Gabriella Smith: “Carrot Revolution”

The future of classical music is a shaping up to be a promising one, especially with such a solid generation of young composers on the horizon. From the hyperkinetic sound worlds of Andrew Norman to the Hindustani influences of Reena Esmail, there is sure to be no shortage of vibrant new music in the future. (Though it will be up to orchestras and other arts organizations to actually program this music—stay tuned for a post about this in the near future…)

Located within this department of “up-and-coming composers you should know about” is the Northern California-born Gabriella Smith. With a number of prestigious chamber and orchestral performances already under her belt (including the LA Phil), she clearly has a promising career ahead.

Currently, one of Smith’s best-known pieces is the amazingly-titled string quartet Carrot Revolution, written for the Aizuri Quartet in 2015 and recorded for the first time this past fall. The work immediately strikes the listener as something totally fresh, yet familiar. Percussive string effects at the opening give way to a wild musical journey, complete with snatches of minimalism, bluegrass, and rock along the way. (Keep an ear out for a glimpse of The Who’s “Baba O’Riley“). It’s a breathtaking, eleven-minute ride for both the quartet and listeners, but one that is well worth taking.